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Thread: Elvis sings of a Purple Haze;)

  1. #1
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    Elvis sings of a Purple Haze;)

    Nice piece o wark (as usual - the main-man for pre-fame Jimi), put a smile on my face anyway - if the connection was not directly conscious, given the time frame and connections, I'm sure it was very strongly subliminal on hearing the USA release which was widely played and, although not a national top twenty, was a radio chart hit in several areas.
    He could have stressed more that it would be very unlikely that JH had not watched this, as several Beatles and Stones hav confessed to watchin it and it bein a big deal to them, Elvis was, after all, prolly their main inspiration in person ('to dream the impossible dream' ha-ha), apart from, musically, Little Richard, Chuck, Holly, Muddy, JB, Wolf . . .etc etc...not too long ago
    http://www.earlyhendrix.com/backgrounds#elvismedley

    Frank Zappa: "Rock journalism is people who can't write interviewing people who can't talk for people who can't read."

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    Re: Elvis sings of a Purple Haze;)

    In "Following the Equator" Mark Twain writes of descending the Himalayas (Twain got around!) as they were "veiled in in a dreamy purple haze". I'm not suggesting that Elvis or Jimi got the phrase from Twain, but it's been around. In fact, Twain used it also in "Life on the Mississipi":

    "When the sun gets well up and distributes a pink flush here and a powder of gold yonder and a purple haze where it will yield the best effect, you will grant that you've seen something worth remembering

    Someone on Facebook pointed me to Google NGRAM Viewer, a marvelous etymology tool of which I was previously unaware. It shows that the phrase "purple haze" goes all the way back to the 1800's. Prior to Jimi, it was most in vogue around 1900, probably thanks to Mark Twain.
    Last edited by Roland Stone; 05-29-20 at 04:39 PM.

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